Weekly Word Definition – Judgement

Judgement (or US spelling judgment) is also known as adjudication which means the evaluation of evidence to make a decision. Judgement is also the ability to make considered decisions. The term has at least five distinct uses. Aristotle suggested we think of the opposite of different uses of a term, if one exists, to help determine if the uses are really different. Some opposites will be included here to help demonstrate their uses are really distinct.       Wikipedia

What is the difference between Judgement and Verdict?

In context terms, the difference between judgment and verdict is that judgment is the legal act of determining, as in courts of law, what is conformable to law and justice; also, the determination, decision, or sentence of a court, or of a judge, while verdict is the legal decision on an issue of fact in a civil or criminal case or an inquest.  Wikidiff

What does a judgement mean?

The act of judging. Judgment (Noun) The power or faculty of performing such operations; especially, when unqualified, the faculty of judging or deciding rightly, justly, or wisely; as, a man of judgment; a politician without judgment.

It has been my observation that most politicians are short on morals but are abundant in their need to judge others.

True Christians on the other hand are quick to use moral thoughts when confronting or advising other Christians as well as the world.

Judgement is not a tool given to Christians; we are given eternal life instead. (John 3:16)

Why are there two spellings?

Many think that the difference between judgement and judgment is that the longer version is the British spelling, whereas the shorter one is the US convention. While some claim that Noah Webster first recorded the spelling of judgment in his 1828 American Dictionary of the English Language, both sides of the pond have used the spelling judgment since the late 1600s.

Though judgement (with an e) has risen and fallen in popularity in British English, judgment remains the preferred spelling in British legal proceedings and appears more frequently in written work. Today, judgement is an accepted spelling in British English. But, if you stick to judgment, you will not be judged in the UK or the US.

Romans 6:1-6 (NKJV)

What shall we say then? Shall we continue in sin that grace may abound? Certainly not! How shall we who died to sin live any longer in it? Or do you not know that as many of us as were baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into His death? Therefore, we were buried with Him through baptism into death, that just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life. For if we have been united together in the likeness of His death, certainly we also shall be in the likeness of His resurrection, knowing this, that our old man was crucified with Him, that the body of sin might be done away with, that we should no longer be slaves of sin.  Our sin nature no longer exists. We are dead to sin!! There are those who spend their lives twisting the word of God and fighting for their right to sin. What will their judgment from God be?

2 Peter 1:2-4 (NKJV)

Grace and peace be multiplied to you in the knowledge of God and of Jesus our Lord, as His divine power has given to us all things that pertain to life and godliness, through the knowledge of Him who called us by glory and virtue, by which have been given to us exceedingly great and precious promises, that through these you may be partakers of the divine nature, having escaped the corruption that is in the world through lust. Those who surrender completely to God and allow the Holy Spirit to lead their lives daily will remain free of sin. The True Christian can have only one verdict from God’s Judgment. “Not Guilty.”

What will your verdict be?

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