Weekly Word Definition – Bondage

Bondage

the state of being a slave

the tenure or service of a villain, serf, or slave

:  a state of being bound usually by compulsion (as of law or mastery): such as

  • a:  captivity, serfdom
  • b:  servitude or subjugation to a controlling person or force young people in bondage to drugs

            Merriam-Webster

Used in two senses in Scripture, a literal and a metaphorical sense.

(1) In the former sense, it refers

(a) to the condition of the Hebrews (ăbhōdhāh) in Egypt (Exodus 1:14; 2:23) which is frequently called “the house of bondage,” Exodus 13:3, 14; 20:2; Deut. 5:6. It also refers to the condition of the Hebrews in Babylonia (Isaiah 14:3) and in Persia (Ezra 9:8), where a slightly different form of the same root (abhedhūth) is used in the original. In both these cases the bondage was not so much personal as national. As a rule, individuals were not subject to individuals, but the whole Hebrew people were subject to the Egyptian, Babylonian and the Persian states. They were forced to labor on public works, and otherwise, and were denied their own freedom when the exigencies of state seemed to demand it. The former word ʿăbhōdāh is also used in Neh. 5:18 as descriptive of the subject and depressed conditions of the Hebrews in Palestine during the earlier years after their return from captivity, when they were still living under Persian suzerainty.

(b) The word bondage ʿăbhādhīm is also used to describe the slavery into which the poor Jews were being forced by their more prosperous brethren in the earlier years under the Persians in Palestine (Neh. 5:5). Here true personal, though temporary, slavery is meant.

(c) Marriage is once referred to as a bondage (1 Cor. 7:15). It wasn’t the marriage that Paul was referring to, it was the obligations concerned with marriage.

(2) It is used in the metaphorical sense only in New Testament.

 “Bondage,” is the power of physical corruption as against the freedom of life (Romans 8:21), the power of fear as over against the confidence of Christian faith (Romans 8:15; Hebrews 2:15), and especially is it the bondage of the letter, of the elements, of a ceremonial and institutional salvation which must be scrupulously and painfully observed, as contrasted with the freedom of the sons of God, emancipated by faith in Jesus Christ. This bondage is a peculiarly Pauline idea since he was fighting for Christian freedom (Galatians 2:4; Galatians 4:3, 9, 24-25; Galatians 5:1). In 2 Peter 2:19 the idea is essentially different. Libertinism, masquerading under the name of freedom, is branded as bondage, in contrast with the true freedom of righteous living.

The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia.

Bondage to sin is not necessary. Those who are true Christians have nothing to do with bondage to sin.

Romans 6:4-6 (NKJV)

Therefore, we were buried with Him through baptism into death, that just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life. For if we have been united together in the likeness of His death, certainly we also shall be in the likeness of His resurrection, knowing this, that our old man was crucified with Him, that the body of sin might be done away with, that we should no longer be slaves of sin.

Through our faith in Jesus Christ, the Holy Spirit will guide us in a life free from sin if we will let Him. Don’t get caught up in bondage, it’s not worth it. Instead, listen to the Holy Spirit and live the bible every day. If you are living the bible, there will be no room for bondage in your life.

Weekly Word Definition – Blasphemy

The Definition for the week is for Blasphemy:

The act or offense of speaking sacrilegiously about God or sacred things; profane talk:

a:  the act of insulting or showing contempt or lack of reverence for God.

b:  the act of claiming the attributes of a deity: Merriam – Webster.

In classical Greek this word meant primarily “defamation” or “evil-speaking” in general; “a word of evil omen,” hence, “impious, and irreverent speech against God.”

The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia.

Sadly, many people commit blasphemy every day and don’t even know it. We hear these big words used by teachers and preachers in their teachings, but no one ever tells you what they mean. Until recently many people didn’t have access to a bible dictionary and the other dictionaries don’t have a lot to say about words from the bible.

I think everyone has accidentally crossed over this line at one time or another. However, there are some that cross these lines without hesitation.

Just as Christ, what we have is the Holy Spirit.

We don’t have healing powers of our own. We must depend on the healing power from God.

We don’t have the power to raise the dead. What we do have is the Divine Love and Holy nature we need to console the families of the dead. This love and divine knowledge come from God and only to those who study and get to know God.

People who hate God for some reason, people who doubt God’s abilities and especially those who think they know more than God, all these are committing blasphemy every day.

Man was created to be a friend and companion to God. Then man sinned, and God is trying to bring as many as He possibly can back to His good Grace. God is willing to forgive even blasphemy, but you must meet God halfway.

Blasphemy. is a transliteration of a Greek word meaning literally “to speak harm.”  In the biblical context, blasphemy is an attitude of disrespect that finds expression in an act directed against the character of God. Old Testament Blasphemy draws its Christian definition throughHolman Bible Dictionary

On television news you can see the biggest form of blasphemy we could ever commit. There are those who take to the streets and demonstrate against the leaders of our nation. They let things escalate into fights and swearing at each other. They curse God and blame Him for what is going on in the world. Then they go to church and sing praises to God without ever asking for His forgiveness.

Weekly Word Definition – Blessed

Blessed:

Made holy; consecrated

a:  held in reverence:  venerated the blessed saints

b:  honored in worship:  hallowed the blessed Trinity

c:  beatific a blessed visitation

            Merriam-Webster

BLESSED

bles’-ed (barukh):

Where God is referred to, this word has the sense of “praise,” as in 1 Samuel 25:32, “Blessed be Yahweh, the God of Israel.” But where man is in mind it is used in the sense of “happy” or “favored,” and most frequently so in the Psalms and the Gospels, as for example, “Blessed is the man that walketh not in the counsel of the wicked” (Psalms 1:1); “Blessed art thou among women” (Luke 1:42); “Blessed are the poor in spirit” (Matthew 5:3). “Bible Study Tools Online”

There are many learned bible scholars that say the word blessed simply means “happy.”   These people have me seriously challenging their walk with God. These same scholars probably also tell the people in their congregation to choose one of the Beatitudes to live by as Christians, I have heard that more than one time.

The Beatitudes are a list of standards that all Christians must live by. Not just one of them, all of them.

The best definition of “Blessed” that I have ever read comes from the Hebrew-Greek Key Study Bible, AMG Publishers, Chattanooga, TN 37422, U.S.A.

Blessed: Makarios

One is pronounced “blessed” when God is present and involved in their life. The hand of God is present and directing all their affairs for a divine purpose, and thus, in a sense, such a person lives Coram Deo; before the face of God. Blessedness is sharing in the life of God (2 Peter 1:4), being favorably affected and influenced by God. This involves, among other things, participating in the Kingdom (Luke 6:20; 12:37) recompense (Luke 14:14), forgiveness (Romans 4:7-8; Matthew 6:14-15), freedom of conscience (Romans 14:22), the Second Coming (Titus 2:13) and the Holy Spirit (1 Peter 4:14). among other things.

The point is that “happiness” is the result of being “Blessed”, not the definition. By having God, the Holy Spirit, living in us and directing us, we are sanctified by God and share in His very being, as He shares in ours.

Those who choose to continue to sin will not see God, muchless be a part of Him.

Weekly Word Definition – Enlighten

Enlighten

“illumination” in every sense, used in the ordinary sense of giving natural light (Psalm 97:4 the King James Version; see also Ezra 9:8) or as a sign of health and vigor (1 Samuel 14:27, 29). “His eyes were enlightened,” literally, “became bright.” He had become weary and faint with the day’s exertions and anxieties, and now recovers (Job 33:30 and compare Psalm 13:3). Thus, in sickness and grief, the eyes are dull and heavy; dying eyes are glazed; but health and joy render them bright and sparkling, as with a light from within.

(2) In Psalm 18:28 the King James Version, The word nāghah, figuratively describes the believer’s deliverance from the gloom of adversity and the restoration of joy in the knowledge of God.

(3) Most frequently the terms so translated mean the giving of spiritual light to the soul (Psalm 19:8; Eph. 1:18, phōtízō; Hebrews 6:4; Hebrews 10:32). This spiritual enlightening the Spirit of God brings about through the Divine word (Psalm 119:130; 2 Tim. 3:15; 2 Peter 1:19). Sin mars the intellectual discernment; “but he that is spiritual discerned all things” (1 Cor. 2:15 King James Version, margin).

The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia.

give (someone) greater knowledge and understanding about a subject or situation:

“Christopher had not enlightened Frances as to their relationship” Merriam-Webster

Weekly Word Definition – Election

Election

The Scripture speaks

  1. of the election of individuals to office or to honor and privilege, e.g., Abraham, Jacob, Saul, David, Solomon, were all chosen by God for the positions they held; so also, were the apostles.
  2. There is also an election of nations to special privileges, e.g., the Hebrews (Deut 7:6; Rom 9:4).
  3. But in addition, there is an election of individuals to eternal life (2 Th. 2:13; Eph. 1:4; 1Pe 1:2; John 13:18).

The ground of this election to salvation is the good pleasure of God (Eph. 1:5, 11; Mat 11:25, 26; John 15:16, 19). God claims the right so to do (Rom 9:16, 21).

It is not conditioned on faith or repentance but is of sovereign grace (Rom 11:4-6; Eph. 1:3-6). All that pertain to salvation, the means (Eph. 2:8; 2Th 2:13) as well as the end, are of God (Acts 5:31; 2Ti 2:25; 1Co 1:30; Eph. 2:5, 10). Faith and repentance and all other graces are the exercises of a regenerated soul; and regeneration is God’s work, a “new creature.”

Men are elected “to salvation,” “to the adoption of sons,” “to be holy and without blame before him in love” (2Th 2:13; Gal 4:4, 5; Eph. 1:4). The ultimate end of election is the praise of God’s grace (Eph. 1:6, 12). Easton’s Illustrated Bible Dictionary

An election is a formal group decision-making process by which a population chooses an individual to hold public office. Elections have been the usual mechanism by which modern representative democracy has operated since the 17th century Elections may fill offices in the legislature, sometimes in the executive and judiciary, and for regional and local government. This process is also used in many other private and business organizations, from clubs to voluntary associations and corporations.

The universal use of elections as a tool for selecting representatives in modern representative democracies is in contrast with the practice in the democratic archetype, ancient Athens, where the Elections were considered an oligarchic institution and most political offices were filled using sortation, also known as allotment, by which officeholders were chosen by lot.

Electoral reform describes the process of introducing fair electoral systems where they are not in place or improving the fairness or effectiveness of existing systems. Psephology is the study of results and other statistics relating to elections (especially with a view to predicting future results).

To elect means “to choose or decide”, and so sometimes other forms of ballot such as referendums are referred to as elections, especially in the United States. Wikipedia

Weekly Word Definition – Bondage

Bondage

the state of being a slave

the tenure or service of a villain, serf, or slave

:  a state of being bound usually by compulsion (as of law or mastery): such as

  1. captivity, serfdom
  2. servitude or subjugation to a controlling person or force young people in bondage to drugs

            Merriam-Webster

Used in two senses in Scripture, a literal and a metaphorical sense.

(1) In the former sense, it refers

  • (a) to the condition of the Hebrews (ăbhōdhāh) in Egypt (Exodus 1:14; 2:23) which is frequently called “the house of bondage,” Exodus 13:3, 14; 20:2; Deut. 5:6. It also refers to the condition of the Hebrews in Babylonia (Isaiah 14:3) and in Persia (Ezra 9:8), where a slightly different form of the same root (abhedhūth) is used in the original. In both these cases the bondage was not so much personal as national. As a rule, individuals were not subject to individuals, but the whole Hebrew people were subject to the Egyptian, Babylonian and the Persian states. They were forced to labor on public works, and otherwise, and were denied their own freedom when the exigencies of state seemed to demand it. The former word ʿăbhōdāh is also used in Neh. 5:18 as descriptive of the subject and depressed conditions of the Hebrews in Palestine during the earlier years after their return from captivity, when they were still living under Persian suzerainty.
  • (b) The word bondage ʿăbhādhīm is also used to describe the slavery into which the poor Jews were being forced by their more prosperous brethren in the earlier years under the Persians in Palestine (Neh. 5:5). Here true personal, though temporary, slavery is meant.
  • (c) Marriage is once referred to as a bondage (1 Cor. 7:15). It wasn’t the marriage that Paul was referring to, it was the obligations concerned with marriage.

(2) It is used in the metaphorical sense only in New Testament.

 “Bondage,” is the power of physical corruption as against the freedom of life (Romans 8:21), the power of fear as over against the confidence of Christian faith (Romans 8:15; Hebrews 2:15), and especially is it the bondage of the letter, of the elements, of a ceremonial and institutional salvation which must be scrupulously and painfully observed, as contrasted with the freedom of the sons of God, emancipated by faith in Jesus Christ. This bondage is a peculiarly Pauline idea since he was fighting for Christian freedom (Galatians 2:4; Galatians 4:3, 9, 24-25; Galatians 5:1). In 2 Peter 2:19 the idea is essentially different. Libertinism, masquerading under the name of freedom, is branded as bondage, in contrast with the true freedom of righteous living.

The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia.

Bondage to sin is not necessary. Those who are true Christians have nothing to do with bondage to sin.

Romans 6:4-6 (NKJV)

Therefore, we were buried with Him through baptism into death, that just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, even so we also should walk in newness of life. For if we have been united together in the likeness of His death, certainly we also shall be in the likeness of His resurrection, knowing this, that our old man was crucified with Him, that the body of sin might be done away with, that we should no longer be slaves of sin.

Through our faith in Jesus Christ, the Holy Spirit will guide us in a life free from sin if we will let Him. Don’t get caught up in bondage, it’s not worth it. Instead, listen to the Holy Spirit and live the bible every day. If you are living the bible, there will be no room for bondage in your life.

Weekly Word Definition – Perfect

Perfect

  1. In the Old Testament:

“Perfect” in the Old Testament is the translation of shālēm, “finished,” “whole,” “complete,” used (except in Deut. 25:15, “perfect weight”) of persons, e.g. a “perfect heart,” i.e. wholly or completely devoted to Yahweh (1 Kings 8:61, etc.; 1 Chron. 12:38; Isaiah 38:3, etc.); tāmīm, “complete,” “perfect,” “sound or unblemished,” is also used of persons and of God, His way, and law (“Noah was a just man and perfect,” the Revised Version margin “blameless” (Genesis 6:9); “As for God, his way is perfect” (Psalm 18:30); “The law of Yahweh is perfect” (Psalm 19:7), etc.); tām, with the same, meaning, occurs only in Job, except twice in Psalms (Job 1:1, 8; Job 2:3, etc.; Psalm 37:37; Psalm 64:4); kālīl, “complete,” and various other words are translated “perfect.”

Perfection is the translation of various words so translated once only: kālīl (Lament. 2:15); mikhlāl, “completeness” (Psalm 50:2); minleh, “possession” (Job 15:29, the King James Version “neither shall the prolong the perfection thereof upon the earth,” the American Standard Revised Version “neither shall their possessions be extended on the earth,” margin “their produce bend to the earth”; the English Revised Version reverses this text and margin); tikhlāh, “completeness,” or “perfection (Psalm 119:96); takhlīth (twice), “end,” “completeness” (Job 11:7, “Canst thou find out the Almighty unto perfection?” Job 28:3, “searcheth out all the Revised Version (British and American) the King James Version, the Revised Version (British and American) “to the furthest bound”; compare Job 26:10, “unto the confines of light and darkness”); tōm, “perfect,” “completeness” (Isaiah 47:9, the King James Version “They shall come upon thee in their perfection,” the Revised Version (British and American) “in their full measure”). The Revised Version margin gives the meaning of “the Urim and the Thummim” (Exodus 28:30, etc.) as “the Lights and the Perfections.”

2. In the New Testament:

In the New Testament “perfect” is usually the tr of teleios, primarily, “having reached the end,” “term,” “limit,” hence, “complete,” “full,” “perfect” (Matthew 5:48, “Ye therefore shall be perfect, as your heavenly Father is perfect”; Matthew 19:21, “if thou wouldst be perfect; Ephes. 4:13, the King James Version “till we all come …. unto a perfect man,” the Revised Version (British and American) “full-grown”; Phil. 3:15, “as many as are perfect,” the American Revised Version margin “full-grown”; 1 Cor. 2:6; Col. 1:28, “perfect in Christ”; 4:12; James 3:2 margin, etc.).

Other words are teleióō. “to perfect,” “to end,” “complete” (Luke 13:32, “The third day I am perfected,” the Revised Version margin “end my course”; John 17:23, “perfected into one”; 2 Cor. 12:9; Phil. 3:12, the Revised Version (British and American) “made perfect”; Hebrews 2:10, etc.); also epiteléō, “to bring through to an end” (2 Cor. 7:1, “perfecting holiness in the fear of God”; Galatians 3:3, “Are ye now made perfect by the flesh?” the King James Version, the Revised Version (British and American) “perfected in the flesh,” margin “Do ye now make an end in the flesh?”); katartízō “to make quite ready,” “to make complete,” is translated “perfect,” “to perfect” (Matthew 21:16, “perfected praise”; Luke 6:40, “Every one when he is perfected shall be as his teacher”; 1 Cor. 1:10; 2 Cor. 13:11, “be perfected”; 1 Thes. 3:10; 1 Peter 5:10, the Revised Version margin “restore”); akribṓs, “accurately,” “diligently,” is translated “perfect” (Luke 1:3, “having had perfect understanding,” the Revised Version (British and American) “having traced …. accurately”; Acts 18:26 the King James Version, the Revised Version (British and American) “more accurately”). We have also ártios, “fitted,” “perfected” (2 Tim. 3:7, the Revised Version (British and American) “complete”); plēróō, “to fill,” “to make full” (Rev. 3:2, the American Standard Revised Version “perfected,” the English Revised Version “fulfilled”); katartismós, “complete adjustment,” “perfecting” (Ephes. 4:12, “for the perfecting of the saints”).

Perfection is the translation of katártisis “thorough adjustment,” “fitness” (2 Cor. 13:9, the Revised Version (British and American) “perfecting”); of teleíōsis (Hebrews 7:11); of teleiótēs (Hebrews 6:1, the Revised Version margin “full growth”); it is translated “perfectness” (Col. 3:14); “perfection” in Luke 8:14 is the translation of telesphoréō, “to bear on to completion or perfection.” In Apocrypha “perfect,” “perfection,” etc., are for the most part the translation of words from télos, “the end,” e.g. Wisdom 4:13; Sirach 34:8; Sirach 44:17; Sirach 45:8, suntéleia “full end”; Sirach 24:28; Sirach 50:11.

The Revised Version (British and American) has “perfect” for “upright” (2 Samuel 22:24, 26 twice); for “sound” (Psalm 119:80); for “perform” (Phil. 1:16); for “undefiled” (Psalm 119:1, margin “upright in way”); for “perfect peace, and at such a time” (Ezra 7:12), “perfect and so forth”; for “He makes my way perfect” (2 Samuel 22:33), “He guided the perfect in his way,” margin “or, `sets free.’ According to another reading, `guided my way in perfectness'”; “shall himself perfect,” margin “restore,” for, “make you perfect” (1 Peter 5:10); “perfecter” for “finisher” (Hebrews 12:2); “perfectly” is omitted in the Revised Version (British and American) (Matthew 14:36); “set your hope perfectly on” for the King James Version “hope to the end for” (1 Peter 1:13).

The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia.

Weekly Word Definition – Bishop

Bishop

New Testament Use:

The word is once applied to Christ himself, “unto the Shepherd and Bishop of your souls” (1 Peter 2:25). It abounds in Pauline literature, and is used as an alternative for presbyters or elder (Titus 1:5, 7; 1 Tim. 3:1; Tim. 4:14; Tim. 5:17, 19). The earliest ecclesiastical offices instituted in the church were those of elders and deacons, or rather the reverse, since the latter office grew almost immediately out of the needs of the Christian community at Jerusalem (Acts 6:1-6). The presbyter constitution of Jerusalem must have been very old (Acts 11:30) and was distinct from the apostolate (Acts 15:2, 4, 6, 22-23; Acts 16:4). As early as 50 AD Paul appointed “elders” in every church, with prayer and fasting (Acts 14:23), referring to the Asiatic churches before established. But in writing to the Philippians (Phil. 1:1) he speaks of “bishops” and “deacons.” In the Gentile Christian churches this title evidently had been adopted; and it is only in the Pastoral Epistles that we find the name “presbyters” applied. The name “presbyter” or “elder,” familiar to the Jews, signifies their age and place in the church; while the other term “bishop” refers rather to their office. But both evidently have reference to the same persons. Their office is defined as “ruling” (Romans 12:8), “overseeing” (Acts 20:17, 28; 1 Peter 5:2), caring for the flock of God (Acts 20:28). But the word archeín, “to rule,” in the hierarchical sense, is never used. Moreover, each church had a college of presbyter-bishops (Acts 20:17, 28; Phil. 1:1; 1 Tim. 4:14). During Paul’s lifetime, the church was evidently still unaware of the distinction between presbyters and bishops.

Of a formal ordination, in the later hierarchical sense, there is no trace as yet. The word “ordained” used in the King James Version (Acts 1:22) is an unwarrantable interpolation, rightly emended in the Revised Version (British and American). Neither the word “cheirotonésantes” (Acts 14:23, translated “appointed” the American Standard Revised Version) nor katastésēs (Titus 1:5, translated “appoint” the American Standard Revised Version) is capable of this translation. In rendering these words invariably by “ordain” the King James Version shows a “victium originis”. No one doubts that the idea of ordination is extremely old in the history of the church, but the laying on of hands, mentioned in the New Testament (Acts 13:3; 1 Tim. 4:14; 2 Tim. 1:6; compare Acts 14:26; Acts 15:40) points to the communication of a spiritual gift or to its invocation, rather than to the imparting of an official status.

Later Development of the Idea:

According to Rome, as finally expressed by the Council of Trent, and to the episcopal idea in general, the hierarchical organization, which originated in the 3rd century, existed from the beginning in the New Testament church. But besides the New Testament as above quoted, the early testimony of the church maintains the identity of “presbyters” and “bishops.” Thus, Clement of Rome (Epistle 1, chapters 42, 44, 57), the Didache, chapter 15; perhaps the Constitutions, II, 33, 34, in the use of the plural form; Ambrosiaster (on 1 Tim. 3:10; Ephes. 4:11), Chrysostom (Hom. 9 in Ep. ad Tim), in an unequivocal statement, the “presbyters of old were called bishops …. and the bishop’s presbyters,” equally unequivocally Jerome (Titus, 1, 7), “the same is the presbyter, who is also the bishop.” Augustine and other Fathers of the 4th and 5th centuries hold this view, and even Peter Lombard, who preceded Aquinas as the great teacher of the church of the Middle Ages. Hatch of Oxford and Harnack of Berlin, in the face of all this testimony, maintain a distinction between the presbyters, as having charge of the law and discipline of the church, and the bishops, as being charged with the pastoral care of the church, preaching and worship. This theory is built upon the argument of prevailing social conditions and institutions, as adopted and imitated by the church, rather than on sound textual proof. The distinction between presbyters and bishops can only be maintained by a forced exegesis of the Scriptures. The later and rapid growth of the hierarchical idea arose from the accession of the Ebionite Christian view of the church, as a necessary continuation of the Old Testament dispensation, which has so largely influenced the history of the inner development of the church in the first six centuries of her existence.

The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia.

Weekly Word Definition – Communion

Communion

  1. The sharing or exchanging of intimate thoughts and feelings, especially when the exchange is on a mental or spiritual level.
  2. The service of Christian worship at which bread and wine are consecrated and shared.
  3. A relationship of recognition and acceptance between Christian churches or denominations, or between individual Christians or Christian communities and a church (signified by a willingness to give or receive the Eucharist).
What is the meaning of Communion and why do it?

Communion is defined as “the sharing or exchanging of intimate thoughts and feelings, especially when the exchange is on a mental or spiritual level.” Communion is sometimes referred to as the Lord’s Supper, Holy Communion, or in some church denominations as Eucharist, or Sacrament.

Essentially, communion is a form of gratitude. While you are asking for guidance through prayer and forgiveness from your sins, communion also serves as a time to remember the blessings. Identifying the blessings, in your life, can serve as a launch pad for a better understanding and outlook for the future.

John 13:12-15 (NKJV)

So, when He had washed their feet, taken His garments, and sat down again, He said to them, “Do you know what I have done to you? You call me Teacher and Lord, and you say well, for so I am. If I then, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet. For I have given you an example, that you should do as I have done to you.

Those who have shown faith and humility know that Christ loves, and He loves them to the end. Nothing can separate a true believer from the love of Christ. Those who are true believers; demonstrate their love, faith, and devotion 24 hours a day.

We don’t know when our time will come, therefore what we have to do in constant preparation for it, should never be undone. You can’t be a Christian today and a sinner tomorrow and still be in the good graces of God. Make up your mind. You’re a Saint or a sinner.

There are churches that are advocating sin as an acceptable behavior. What is acceptable for us is totally inappropriate to God.

Jesus gave yet another example for us to follow and most of our churches choose to ignore it because they think mankind is too good to be that humble. Why would a bank president want to wash the feet of a homeless person? Why would a bank president, hotel owner, real-estate mogul or any other person of high status want to wash the feet of anyone other than those of their own status?

Why would the King of Kings want to shed His blood to save a sinner like you?

Weekly Word Definition – Church

Church:

a building used for public Christian worship.

Synonyms:

house of God · the Lord’s house · house of prayer 

church

A building for public Christian worship. public worship of God or a religious service in such a building: to attend church regularly.

The whole body of Christian believers; Christendom.

What is the Church and its function?

The basic function of the church is to be involved in every facet of the life of the believer. Holding true to this mission, Christ looked at the needs of the people, provided it, and then begun to preach about the good deeds.

Today, humans have acquired more knowledge than any other time in history.   Science and medicine are going places never before imagined.  We have bigger jets and cruise liners, faster computers, and helpful drugs for certain diseases are being discovered every day.  Daniel envisioned a time when knowledge would increase (Daniel 12:4).  We have much evidence today of our successes in these and many other areas.  We have improved on just about every area of life.

 Every year Forbes magazine publishes a list of the richest people in the world.  This list continues to grow longer and longer.  More people can afford vacations, purchase houses, and buy brand new cars.  Some car dealership will have cars for sale that can be purchased with zero percent down.  Life, overall, seems comfortable for most Americans.  When life is good, most people tend to forget about church… well, until something happens that turns their lives upside down.

Personal or national tragedy (such as 9/11) seems to cause a major shift in people’s assessment of church.  It is a time when people flock to churches in droves. There is just something about churches that society finds in times of tragedy and hardship. This always fascinates me because the media and public, embrace church or (the idea of church) during a time of crisis, but in times of peace and prosperity, the church seems to become irrelevant again. Regardless of this double standard, the church keeps people grounded, flushing out the burden of life by providing a bedrock of faith and answers to humanity’s deepest needs.

The Bible says that the Lord only has one body, which is His one church. Ephesians 4:4-6 says, “There is one body and one Spirit, just as you were called in one hope of your calling; one Lord, one faith, one baptism; one God and Father of all, who is above all, and through all, and in you all.”

The role of the modern church in the life of the 21st-century believer is critical because it fills a void only the church can.

It seems that every week, there is some type of national incident that is responsible for taking the lives of many people at one time. There are large accidents involving many cars on the freeways. There are mass shootings in churches, workplaces, supermarkets, picnics, and many other types of large gatherings. This is satan’s attempt at keeping people from loving one another. This is just another attempt at keeping people from spreading God’s word. Another attempt at breaking up the concept of church.

If a car needs fixing, it is brought to the mechanic shop.  If someone is sick, the health center or hospital is the best place to seek medical attention.  Church is where people should go if they are in need of a “spiritual fix.”  The church is really a hospital for sinners and not an exclusive club for saints.

So why would someone want to attend church?  Regardless of what is said about churches, people expect that their life problems can be addressed in some fashion or form.  With all the weight and pressures of their world weighing down on their minds, people expect the church to provide Bible-based answers that no other institution can provide.

God doesn’t have a magic wand; God has a large number of disciples. God inspires these disciples to help those that need them. God uses His word to heal, change lives, comfort, and yes to bring salvation to those who desire it.

Don’t look for a preacher that will bring a message every Sunday if you pay them. Look for a preacher that will inspire you to use your money to help those who need help. Not to make themselves look good, but because God tells us through His Son to “Love one another.” (THE CHURCH)